Supercars at Sydney Motorsport Park 2017

In 2019 the Supercars series will not be competing at Sydney Motorsport Park Eastern Creek Raceway.

This is disappointing because for fans attending the track as it is one of the few venues with excellent viewing opportunities right around the track.

Below is a small selection from my last visit to the venue in 2017 and a clip from the race start that year as well.

Photos: Muscle Car Masters 2016

At the end of October I went to the annual Muscle Car Masters at Sydney Motorsport Park.

This was the first time I had attended the MCM and it was a great day out. Watching the old cars from well before my time and from my childhood was a great change from the modern Supercars that I usually watch.

Below is a small selection of photos covering the various categories and eras racing during the event.

Photos: Sculpture By The Sea 2016

In late October the annual Sculpture By The Sea Exhibition was held along Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs Coastline.

I went down late in the afternoon of the first weekend, luckily before huge swells destroyed many of the sculptures.

Below are a few photos from that day.

Photos: 20th Biennale of Sydney

Over the past two months I’ve spent a few weekends checking out the 20th Biennale of Sydney. I haven’t been to all the locations where the Biennale is held this year, but I have seen the exhibits at Cockatoo Island, the MCA and the NSW Art Gallery.

Many of this year’s exhibits are audio/visual in nature but the few photos below capture at least some of the amazing art that’s there to be experienced.

Vale Parachute Festival

A few weeks ago it was announced that the annual Parachute Music Festival would be no more. This is a great loss to the youth of New Zealand.

With my mate Herbie at Parachute 03
With my mate Herbie at Parachute 03

During my teenage years and early 20s I attended seven Parachute Festivals. My first was as a 15 year old in 2003, this was also the last year Parachute was held at Totara Springs in Matamata. Despite this now being over eleven years ago (wow time goes quick), I still have a number of memories of my first festival: trying to be a good kid and go to bed at 11pm on the Friday night and not being able to sleep cause of the noise from all the music stages; watching TobyMac, a very young Rapture Ruckus, and Pillar perform on the mainstage; trying to join the mosh and circle pits inside the cage; and chilling in the afternoon sun on the grass as Steve Apirana played acoustic.

After that first festival I was hooked, Parachute was like no other concert or festival I’ve been to. While the move to Mystery Creek, Hamilton in 2004 saw the production value of the festival increase the core of the festival remained the same – four days of young people being exposed to a wide variety of music and genres, building closer friendships with the people they travelled to the festival with, randomly bumping into old school friends and church mates, and learning about the relevance of God and Christianity in the present – generally, all without parents.

And this is what made Parachute Festival unique. For me personally, I have so many memories of things that have happened at Parachute over the years, I have seen hundreds of bands play and be exposed to music that in the past I wouldn’t have dared thought to like. But three memories stand out: the Newsboys performing and in the middle of Shine basically stopping their show for ten minutes and standing in worship; Dave Dobbyn having to stop playing as the rain poured down and the mosh pit dancing in the rain chanting ‘da da da slice of heaven’; and no matter how late you had gone to bed the previous night forcing yourself to get up and attend the morning church service.

Dave Dobbyn in the rain
Dave Dobbyn in the rain
Parachute Morning Meeting
Parachute Morning Meeting

In the decision to end Parachute Festival, Mark de Jong is right in saying that there are many more big music festivals in New Zealand now and this makes Parachute Festival commercially difficult. However, the big music, while a key component, is only one component of the festival.

Debut Stage 2009
Debut Stage 2009
Another highlight of the festival over the years has been to see many hundreds of small bands play on the debut stage. Many of these bands are teenagers with their garage bands who would normally only play to a maximum of 50 people at a church find themselves performing in front of hundreds and at times thousands of people. This was something very special to heart of Parachute Festival, again there are battle of the bands and other shows for small bands, but the scale of Parachute Festival in this area was like nothing else.

Overall, the end of Parachute Festival is a great loss to the youth of New Zealand, there is nothing else like it. While I’m certain that some newer events will fill some of the void left e.g. Easter Camp, for a long time yet many people will be saying ‘when I was a teenager.. Parachute Festival.’

Photos: Top Gear Festival Sydney 2014